Bike Helmet Size and Fit Guide



A helmet is a personal decision. You must consider proper safety labeling, type, fit and comfort when making a choice. We’ll take you through these considerations, and we’ll even list 36 great options of 2017, that you can find online.

1) Giro Savant MIPS Helmet Matte | 2) Giro Aerohead Ultimate MIPS TT Helmet | 3) Star Wars: R2-D2 Child Multi Sport Helmet | 4) Kask Protone Helmet | 5) Crazy Safety Prem Black Dragon Helmet | 6) Melon Urban Active Collection Helmet | 7) Leadtry HM-1 Bicycle Helmet Ultralight Integrally | 8) Smith Optics Forefront Adult Off-Road Cycling Helmet | 9) Coros LINX Smart Cycling Helmet Open | 10) Custom Predator Motorcycle Helmet | 11) Giro Ledge MIPS: Snow Helmet | 12) Lucky Bums Powder Series Helmet | 13) Giro Atmos II Helmet | 14) GoMax Aero Adult Safety Helmet | 15) Bell Youth Multi-Sport Helmet | 16) Lazer O2 Helmet | 17) Bell Javelin Time Helmet | 18) Giro Me2 Infant/Toddler Bike Helmet | 19) Giro Reverb Bike Helmet | 20) Giro Revel Bike Helmet | 21) Demon Podium Full Face Mountain Bike Helmet | 22) Adult Mens Racing Cycling Helmet | 23) Smith Optics Forefront Cycling Helmet | 24) High-Performance Airflow BIKE HELMET | 25) Children’s Multi-Sport Ladybug Helmet For Girls | 26) Bell Sidetrack MIPS Helmet | 27) Kask Protone Helmet | 28) Gonex Adult Bike Helmet | 29) Krash Cube Hurt Mohawk Helmet | 30) Giro Switchblade MIPS MTB Helmet | 31) Nutcase – Metroride MIPS Bike Helmet | 32) Base Camp Firewall Road Bike Helmet | 33) Bern Unlimited Lenox EPS Women’s Summer Helmet | 34) Bell Super 3R MIPS Bike Helmet | 35) Nutcase – Baby Nutty Bike Helmet | 36) SG Dreamz Kids Protective Skateboard Helmet |

How to Choose a Bike Helmet

We have a one of the largest selections of bike gear on the web, a super knowledgeable staff and expert guides to help you make an informed decision.

Whether you’re a casual rider who enjoys cruising into town on your singlespeed or an enduro athlete gearing up for your next off-road adventure, a bike helmet is a necessary accessory.

Thanks to recent innovations in helmet design, bike helmets are becoming lighter and more comfortable to wear, all while further reducing and preventing head injuries. The trick is you’ve got to be wearing one for it to do its job (kind of a no-brainer)! Read on to find the helmet that’s right for you, as well as how to dial in the perfect fit.

Whether you’re a casual recreationalist who enjoys cruising into town on your singlespeed or an enduro athlete gearing up for your next off-road adventure, a bike helmet is a necessary accessory.

Thanks to recent innovations in helmet design, bike helmets have gotten lighter, more comfortable, prevent an increasing amount of head injuries. The trick is you’ve got to be wearing one for it to do its job (kind of a no-brainer)! Read on to find the helmet that’s right for you, as well as how to dial in the perfect fit.

Bike Helmet Sizing & Fit

Whether you’re a casual recreationalist who enjoys cruising into town on your singlespeed or an enduro athlete gearing up for your next off-road adventure, a bike helmet is a necessary accessory.

Thanks to recent innovations in helmet design, bike helmets have gotten lighter, more comfortable, prevent an increasing amount of head injuries. The trick is you’ve got to be wearing one for it to do its job (kind of a no-brainer)! Read on to find the helmet that’s right for you, as well as how to dial in the perfect fit.

Measure Your Head

Take a soft measuring tape and wrap it around your head about one inch above your eyebrows and ears. Make sure the tape is level. Most helmets are measured in centimeters, so measure your head in centimeters if you can. In case you don’t have a centimeter tape, the conversion ratio is 1 inch = 2.54 cm. Then, choose a helmet size to match your measurement.

Don’t have a soft tape measure? Take a piece of string and wrap it around your head, then measure the string.

Try it on

After you receive your new helmet, put it on. The helmet should sit level on your head. The front of the helmet should sit one inch (or less) above your eyebrows, protecting your forehead.

Adjust the fit using the helmet’s retention system (located in the back, usually a click wheel or a ratchet system). The helmet should feel snug. You don’t want any excess space between the helmet and your head. Pay attention to any pressure points as they may be an indication that the helmet is too small.

Buckle Up

Connect the chin strap and tighten it so that it’s snug but comfortable beneath your chin. You should be able to fit no more than one finger between the strap and your chin. The straps should form a “V” as they rest under each ear. With the chinstrap buckled, open your mouth wide. You should feel the helmet press against the top of your head.

Shake Test

Push the helmet from side to side and back to front. If the helmet shifts noticeably, try adjusting the helmet using its retention system. The helmet shouldn’t be able to move more than one inch in any direction during the shake test once you’ve dialed in the perfect fit.

Ready to Ride

Bike helmet straps can loosen on rides and during travel. Give your helmet a quick shake test before every outing. Then you’re ready to ride!

What About Kids’ Helmets?

All of the same rules described above apply to kids’ helmets. However, fitting kids for helmets can be more difficult because they don’t know exactly how to describe to you how snug their helmet feels. Be sure to pay extra attention to how snug the helmet is and if your kids complain about anything that hurts. Do not size a helmet with room to grow; if it is too large it is unsafe.

Photo Gallery of the Bike Helmet Size and Fit Guide

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